Transcription

IBM InfoSphere Optim for DB2 for z/OSVersion 7 Release 2Common Elements

IBM InfoSphere Optim for DB2 for z/OSVersion 7 Release 2Common Elements

NoteBefore using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on page 397.Version 7 Release 2This edition applies to version 7, release 2 of IBM InfoSphere Optim for DB2 for z/OS and to all subsequentreleases and modifications until otherwise indicated in new editions. Copyright IBM Corporation 1991, 2013.US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contractwith IBM Corp.

ContentsAbout this publication . . . . . . . . viiChapter 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . 1Test Data Management . . . . . . . . . .Data Privacy . . . . . . . . . . . . .Data Retention, Application Retirement, and DataGrowth Management . . . . . . . . . .Optim Components . . . . . . . . . . .Common Elements and Facilities . . . . . .General Information . . . . . . . . . . .Basic Screen Format and Handling . . . . .Processing Order . . . . . . . . . . .Naming Conventions . . . . . . . . .Sample Database . . . . . . . . . .Help and Tutorial Facility . . . . . . .Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . .Choose a Definition Option . . . . . . . .Object Selection List Functions . . . . . .Double-Byte Character Set Support . . . . . 1. 1. 1. 1. 2. 4. 4. 5. 6. 10. 10. 11. 12. 15. 18Chapter 2. Access Definitions . . . . . 21Select an Access Definition . . . . . . .Access Definition Selection List . . . . .Components of an Access Definition . . . .Table/View Selection . . . . . . . . .Table Status Indicators. . . . . . . .List Table Names . . . . . . . . .Handling the Table List . . . . . . .Completed Table Selection . . . . . .Associate Legacy Tables with Data Sources .Selection Criteria . . . . . . . . . .Archive Criteria . . . . . . . . . .Selection Criteria . . . . . . . . .SQL WHERE Clause Specifications . . .Manage Data Displays. . . . . . . .Data Types Supported . . . . . . . .Zoom Column Information . . . . . .Archive Actions . . . . . . . . . . .Substitution Variables . . . . . . . . .The Point-and-Shoot Facility. . . . . . .Initial Display for Point-and-Shoot. . . .Point-and-Shoot Basics . . . . . . .Select Rows . . . . . . . . . . .Scroll Data. . . . . . . . . . . .Join Tables. . . . . . . . . . . .Manage the Display . . . . . . . .Display SQL . . . . . . . . . . .Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . .Terminate a Point-and-Shoot Session . . .Row List Status Indicated. . . . . . .Group Selection Processing . . . . . . .Select Relationships. . . . . . . . . .Display Information . . . . . . . .Relationship Status . . . . . . . . .Display Traversal Information . . . . . Copyright IBM Corp. 1991, 98080808383848586909194Relationship Index Analysis . . . .Use Relationships . . . . . . . .Sample Scenarios . . . . . . .Traversal Cycles . . . . . . .Referential Cycles . . . . . . .Dynamically Define the Access DefinitionDatabase Changes . . . . . . . .Access Definition Parameters . . . . 96. 97. 97. 103. 104. 110. 110. 112Chapter 3. Primary Keys. . . . . . . 115Select a Primary Key . . . .Primary Key Selection List .Edit or Browse a Primary Key .Edit a Generic Primary Key .116117119122Chapter 4. Relationships . . . . . . 125Select a Relationship . . . . .Relationship Selection List . .Create a Relationship . . . . .Edit or Browse a Relationship . .Exit Routines for RelationshipsPopulate Column Names . .Expressions . . . . . . .Model a Relationship . . . .Save and Use a Relationship .Edit a Generic Relationship. . .125127129130132139145148150152Chapter 5. Column Maps . . . . . . 155Select a Column Map. . . . . . . . . .Column Map Selection List . . . . . . .Tables for a Column Map . . . . . . . .Source or Source 1 Table. . . . . . . .Column Map Editor . . . . . . . . . .Manage Display . . . . . . . . . .Edit Source Column Values. . . . . . .LIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Type a Source Column Value . . . . . .Functions for Source Column Values . . .Expressions for Source Column Values . . .Special Register - for an IMS Concatenated KeyExit Routines for Source Column Values . .Data Privacy Functions . . . . . . . .Data Privacy Transformation Library FunctionsChapter 6. Table Maps.156158159161162165166167169170172173. 174. 178188. . . . . . . 199Select a Table Map . . . . . . . . . . .Table Map Selection List. . . . . . . . .Source for a Table Map . . . . . . . . . .Specify Table Map Source . . . . . . . .Specify Table Map Source Types and SourcesTable Map Editor . . . . . . . . . . . .Edit Destination or Source 2 Table List . . . .Apply a Table Map . . . . . . . . . .Include a Column Map . . . . . . . . .Associate Legacy Tables with Data Destinations199201203203204205210211212216iii

Archive Actions. 221Chapter 7. Export and Import OptimObjects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229Use the Export Process . . .Select the Objects for ExportBuild the Output File. . .Export Summary . . . .Use the Import Process . . .Import Summary . . . .File Format . . . . . . .Primary Keys . . . . .Relationships . . . . .Access Definitions . . . .Column Maps . . . . .Table Maps . . . . . .Compare Definition . . .Legacy Tables . . . . .Environment Definitions. .Retrieval Definitions . . .Archive Collections . . 62Chapter 8. Convert Archive andExtract Files . . . . . . . . . . . . 263Convert File Panel. . . .Output to External FormatPerform Convert Process .Online Execution . . .Batch Execution . . .Convert Process Report .Chapter 9. Retry/Restart a Process.263266267267268269273Chapter 10. Browse Related Data . . . 277Display Basics . . . . . . . . . . .Available Commands . . . . . . . .Join Tables . . . . . . . . . . . .Join Command . . . . . . . . . .Select Tables . . . . . . . . . . .Select Relationships . . . . . . . .Join All Command . . . . . . . .Multiple Table Display . . . . . . .Special Considerations for Multi-way JoinsZoom a Joined Table Display . . . . .Unjoin Tables . . . . . . . . . .Manage the Display . . . . . . . . .Scroll . . . . . . . . . . . . .Navigate and Manage Display of Data . .Sort Criteria . . . . . . . . . . .Maximum Fetch Limit . . . . . . .Display Hexadecimal Data . . . . . .Wide Data Displays . . . . . . . .Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . .Report Contents . . . . . . . . .Report Format Parameters . . . . . .Chapter 11. 299301301302310312313. . . . . . . . 317User Options . . . . . . .User Line Drawing Characters.iv. 318. 324IBM InfoSphere Optim for DB2 for z/OS: Common ElementsPrint Tables in JCL . . . .Specify Description and SecurityFile Unit Parameters . . . .Editor and Display Options . .Job Card and Print Options. . .Compare Options . . . . . .Archive Options . . . . . .Legacy Options. . . . . . . . .Status. . . . . . . . . . . . .325325326328331333334335Chapter 12. Performance . . . . . . 339Processing Strategies .Performance Tools . .Table Access Strategy .Access Method . .Key Lookup Limit .Index Analysis . . .339340340342343343Appendix A. Sample Database Tablesand Structure . . . . . . . . . . . 347SALES Table (FOPDEMO.OPTIM SALES) . . . .CUSTOMERS Table(FOPDEMO.OPTIM CUSTOMERS) . . . . . .ORDERS Table (FOPDEMO.OPTIM ORDERS) . .DETAILS Table (FOPDEMO.OPTIM DETAILS) . .ITEMS Table (FOPDEMO.OPTIM ITEMS) . . . .SHIP TO Table (FOPDEMO.OPTIM SHIP TO) . .SHIP INSTR Table(FOPDEMO.OPTIM SHIP INSTR) . . . . . .MALE RATES Table(FOPDEMO.OPTIM MALE RATES). . . . . .FEMALE RATES Table(FOPDEMO.OPTIM FEMALE RATES) . . . . .STATE LOOKUP Table(FOPDEMO.OPTIM STATE LOOKUP) . . . . .VENDOR File (Legacy Table FOPDEMO.VENDOR)VENDITEM Table (Legacy TableFOPDEMO.VENDITEM) . . . . . . . . .DEPARTMENT Table (IMS Legacy TableFOPDEMO.DEPARTMENT) . . . . . . . .EMPLOYEE Table (IMS Legacy TableFOPDEMO.EMPLOYEE) . . . . . . . . .POSITION Table (IMS Legacy TableFOPDEMO.POSITION) . . . . . . . . . .JOBCODE Table (IMS Legacy TableFOPDEMO.JOBCODE) . . . . . . . . . .Sample Extract File . . . . . . . . . . .Sample Legacy File . . . . . . . . . . .Privacy Extract File . . . . . . . . . . 61361361Appendix B. Allocating External Files365Appendix C. Create a Row List File371Appendix D. Compatibility Rules . . . 375Relationship Column Compatibility . . . . . . 375Column Map Compatibility . . . . . . . . 377Move and Archive Column Map Compatibility 380Compare Column Map Compatibility . . . . 381

Appendix E. Optim Exit ParameterLists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 401Appendix F. Glossary . . . . . . . . 387Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397Trademarks . 398Contentsv

viIBM InfoSphere Optim for DB2 for z/OS: Common Elements

About this publicationThis document provides information on using the elements common to the components of Optim .For detailed information on each component, refer to the appropriate user manual.Note: Certain aspects of an element common to all Optim components do not apply to all components.For example, all Optim components use Access Definitions. However, only Archive supports ArchiveActions, which can be included in an Access Definition. Any features that do not apply to all installationsof Optim are clearly noted. Copyright IBM Corp. 1991, 2013vii

viiiIBM InfoSphere Optim for DB2 for z/OS: Common Elements

Chapter 1. IntroductionIBM Optim for z/OS manages enterprise data throughout every stage of the information life cycle.Optim enables you to assess, classify, subset, archive, store, and access enterprise application data.Optim uses the relationships defined in the DB2 Catalog, where available, and supplements theserelationships with those defined in the Optim Directory. Optim runs as a TSO/ISPF application andincorporates familiar ISPF commands. Optim handles any number of tables and any number ofrelationships, regardless of the complexity.Optim helps you achieve these benefits with the following components: Access, Archive, Move, andCompare. You can use these Optim components for test data management, data privacy, data retention,application retirement, and data growth management. This manual describes the use of elements that arecommon to all Optim components.Test Data ManagementThe Optim test data management capabilities provide an efficient alternative to database cloning,allowing you to create development and testing environments that are sized appropriately. Forinformation about the test data management functions of Optim, see the Move User Manual, the AccessUser Manual, and the Compare User Manual.Data PrivacyData privacy is a licensed function of test data management.For information about the general test data management functions of Optim, see the Move User Manual,the Access User Manual, and the Compare User Manual. Data transformations for privacy are accomplishedthrough the use of Optim column maps. For information needed to transform data using a column map,see Chapter 5, “Column Maps,” on page 155.Data Retention, Application Retirement, and Data Growth ManagementYou can use the archiving features in Optim to perform the following tasks:v Isolate historical data from current activity and safely remove it to a secure archive.v Access archived data easily, using familiar tools and interfaces.v Restore archived data to its original business context when it requires additional processing.Optim ComponentsYour site may be licensed for one, all, or a combination of the following Optim components. The MainMenu provides release and copyright information for Optim.v Access is used to browse and edit sets of relationally intact data in multiple database tables. This toolallows you to edit database data, review logical application paths, and browse data after testingapplications to ensure that results are as expected. You can use Access to support rapid development ofapplications, analyze the structure of your database, and browse precisely-defined segments ofrelational data.v Archive enhances database performance by facilitating the removal of infrequently referenced data.This component allows you to identify and archive sets of relationally intact data before removingselected data from your database. Archived data is indexed and stored. You can use Archive to browse,search, or restore selected subsets of archived data. Copyright IBM Corp. 1991, 20131

v Compare facilitates comparisons of sets of relationally intact data. This component allows you tocompare data resulting from application tests to the original data, highlighting all differences. You canuse Compare to rapidly analyze the effects of application software or modifications to it.v Move facilitates the extraction and migration of sets of relationally intact data. Move allows you tocreate test databases that are referentially intact subsets of a production database. You can use Move tocopy sets of related data to a file and transform the data as you migrate it to a test database.Menu-driven prompt screens or panels are used to specify which data to obtain and how to handle thatdata. Intelligent screen handling allows simultaneous display of multiple tables, pop-up windows,context-sensitive online help, and tutorials.Common Elements and FacilitiesFeatures common to all or most of the Optim components are discussed in this book. To carry out theirfunctions, the Optim components rely on user-defined objects that supplement objects defined to thedatabase (for example, tables, primary keys, relationships, stored procedures). These user-defined objects(collectively, Optim objects) are stored in the Optim Directory.Optim ObjectsThe Optim Directory is a set of database tables used by Optim to track processing status and store theobjects needed for processing. Objects that are common to the Optim components include the following:v Access DefinitionsAn Access Definition identifies a set of related data to be processed by Optim. It references thedatabase tables and their relationships, and provides criteria to select specific rows within tables.v An Access Definition is required for an Archive or Extract Process and is sometimes used for aCompare or Restore Process, or an Access edit or browse session.v Primary KeysValues in primary key columns uniquely identify each row in a database table. A primary key can beused to create an Optim relationship, and is required for a table that is changed by a Delete, Insert, orRestore Process or a table that is visited more than once in an Extract or Archive Process. A primarykey is also required to enable the row selection (Point-and-Shoot) feature for an Access Definition or anArchive or Extract Process.v Optim uses primary keys that are defined to the DB2 Catalog or, for Optim Move or Compare for IMS,VSAM, and Sequential Files, in an IBM IMS DBD. You can define Optim primary keys to supplementthose in the database.v RelationshipsA relationship is a defined connection between the rows of two tables that determines the parent orchild rows to be processed and the order in which they are processed. A relationship can be defined inthe DB2 Catalog, the Optim Directory, or to IMS.v Optim uses relationships to determine the data to be retrieved from related tables. Generally, arelationship is needed in a process that uses an Access Definition. Using Optim, you can create ormodify Optim relationships, browse DB2 relationships, or list IMS relationships.v Column MapsA Column Map provides specifications needed to pair columns between two tables referenced in aTable Map. Also, a Column Map can be used to transform data, age dates in tables, and exclude one ormore columns from processing.v A Column Map is used for a single table Compare Process and can be referenced in a Table Map usedfor a Compare, Convert, Insert, Load, or Restore Process. (Rules for Column Maps used with Archiveand Move are different from those for Compare. Features in a Column Map created with Archive orMove may not be available for Compare.)2IBM InfoSphere Optim for DB2 for z/OS: Common Elements

v Table MapsA Table Map identifies and matches two tables or sets of tables in a process and can be used to excludeone or more tables from processing.v A Table Map is required for a Compare, Convert, Insert, Load, or Restore Process. (Rules for TableMaps used with Archive and Move are different from those for Compare.)v Archive CollectionsAn Archive Collection is a mainframe object that contains one or more Archive Files. When an ODMconnection is made using a collection name, the Archive Files in the collection are unioned andpresented to the user as though a single Archive File was being accessed.v For example, say you archive the customer database 50 times a year, and all 50 Archive Files areassigned to the same collection. Each Archive File has selection criteria for a single, unique state. Whenaccessed individually, each Archive File holds only one state's worth of data. However, when accessedvia the collection, data from all 50 states is available for retrieval. A collection can included anynumber of Archive Files, and a given Archive File may be included in more than one collection, buteach Archive File can be included only once in a given collection.Note: Legacy Tables, IMS Environment Definitions, and IMS Retrieval Definitions are available to a sitelicensed for Move or Compare for IMS, VSAM, and Sequential Files. These objects are discussed in Move UserManual, Definitions and Compare for IMS, VSAM, and Sequential Files.UtilitiesUtilities common to the Optim components include the following:v Export/ImportThe Export and Import Processes copy Optim Directory objects (e.g., Access Definitions, Table Maps,etc.) in the current DB2 subsystem to a dataset, so the objects can be imported to an Optim Directory inany DB2 subsystem.v ConvertA Convert Process transforms data in an Extract or Archive File. The converted file can be used asinput to most Optim processes. You can use the Convert Process to mask sensitive data or to convertdata to a Comma Separated Values format to be used with any application that supports CSV files.v Retry/RestartYou can retry an Insert or Restore Process when one or more rows are discarded during the process, orrestart an Insert, Restore, or Delete Process if the process does not execute to completion.v BrowseDuring an Extract File, Archive File, or Compare File browse session or a Point-and-Shoot session, youcan use the Browse facility to join data in related tables and use various techniques to manage thedisplay while viewing the data.v Batch UtilitiesBatch utilities allow you to maintain the Optim environment and automate Optim processes. Usemaintenance utilities to retrieve information from the Optim Directory, maintain objects in the OptimDirectory, migrate Optim objects, and manage Archive File entries and files. Use processing utilities toautomate Optim processes, such as Archive, Restore, Delete, Search, and Extract. (See the Batch UtilitiesGuide for detailed information on using the batch utilities.)OptionsSeveral types of options are available to manage the functions performed while using Optim. Theseoptions includev User Optionsv Editor Optionsv Job Card and Print Optionsv Compare Options (Compare only)Chapter 1. Introduction3

v Archive Options (Archive only)v Legacy Options (Move or Compare for IMS, VSAM, and Sequential Files only).Note: Site Options are only available to users who have authorized passwords. Site Options arediscussed in the Customization Guide, Customize the Optim Site Options.General InformationThis section provides general information about Optim, including basic system concepts and namingconventions.Note: For a description of some common terms and system concepts related to Optim, see Appendix F,“Glossary,” on page 387.Basic Screen Format and HandlingOptim emulates ISPF commands, screen format and handling, and provides an extensive set of primaryand line commands. Many commands are comparable to ISPF commands.When the syntax is identical to ISPF (e.g., UP and DOWN), the functions are identical. However, manycommands, such as FIND, have been extended with operands and functionality to suit Optim.The functioning of several primary commands differs depending on the current Optim activity.Information about these differences is included with the commands described in this manual. Fordetailed information about all Optim primary commands, see the Command Reference Manual, PrimaryCommands.Common PanelFacilities that are common to all Optim components are documented in this manual. For the most part,figures in this manual present the panels as they appear when all Optim components are installed. Thefacilities available exclusively with Archive, Access, Compare, or Move are noted in this manual anddocumented in the appropriate user manual.Pop-up WindowsOptim incorporates a unique pop-up window facility that is independent of the current ISPF release. Apop-up window facilitates the current function, without terminating it.Some pop-up windows provide selection lists. For example, when adding table names to an AccessDefinition, you can display a pop-up window with a list of available tables, and select the desired namesdirectly from the list. When the pop-up window is terminated, the selected tables are automatically listedin the Access Definition and you can continue editing it.For sites using DB2 version 8 or later, pop-up windows are also used to enter Long Object Names (LONs)of up to 128 characters for objects such as tables and creator IDs. Pop-up windows for LONs aredisplayed using the EXPAND command. See “Long Object Names (LONs)” on page 8 for furtherinformation.The characters used to draw the box around a pop-up window are site defined. User options allow youto change these characters. The figures in this manual show pop-up windows delimited by dashes andvertical bars.4IBM InfoSphere Optim for DB2 for z/OS: Common Elements

Function KeysFunction keys are handled as in ISPF. The keys provide a simple way to execute primary commands.When a function key is pressed, it is evaluated as if the command assigned to the key were typed in theprimary command area of the screen. (See PF Keys in the Command Reference Manual for information onassigning values to function keys.)The ISPF command PFSHOW is available to display the function key assignments on the screen. The ISPFcommand KEYS is available to list your current function key assignments. This list is modifiable.Changes to the PF key assignments during an Optim session affect the assignments only while usingOptim. The changes do not affect assignments for other ISPF applications.Several functions are frequently assigned to function keys. The following are of note:HELP Displays Help information for the active Optim panel. This information explains the purpose anduse of the current panel. It may also list the commands available on the current panel. You canscroll certain Help panels, using the function keys F10 and F11. HELP is usually assigned to PF1.ENDProcess input and return to the previously displayed panel. END is usually assigned to PF3.ScrollingAll ISPF scrolling functions are supported. Vertical and horizontal scrolling is coordinated with the scrollvalue specified in SCROLL. This value can be specified as:blank Cursor location determines the scroll amount.PAGE Full page scroll so that the line or column following the last line or column on the current page isthe first line or column of the next page.DATA Full page scroll so that the last line or column on the current screen is the first line or column onthe next screen.HALF Half page scroll.nSpecific number of rows or columns to scroll.MAXDepending on direction, either the first full screen of data or the last full screen of data isdisplayed.Scrolling LONsAnother type of scroll functionality is available for viewing Long Object Names (LONs) that exceed thedisplay area on a given panel. Table names, for example, can consist of up to 128 characters, which islarger than the display area allocated for those names on Optim panels. In such cases, you can use theLEFT and RIGHT function keys (typically F10 and F11) to scroll through the entire LON within thedisplay field. For example, if the Table Name area on a panel is 25 characters in length, only the first 25characters of a 128-character LON are displayed. Press the RIGHT function key to display the next 25characters, until the entire LON has been displayed; conversely, press the LEFT function key to displaythe previous 25 characters.If you need to view the entire LON in a single viewing, you can use the EXPAND command to displaythe entire LON in a pop-up or LON panel. See “Long Object Names (LONs)” on page 8 for moreinformation on entering and displaying LONs.Processing OrderThe CANCEL, HELP, and RESET primary commands take precedence over all other processing and areperformed first; otherwise, information is processed in the following order:Chapter 1. Introduction5

1. All editing is evaluated.2. Line commands are processed.3. Function key requests and primary commands are processed.If editing introduces any syntax errors, all command processing is suspended and an appropriate errormessage is displayed. You must correct the error to resume processing.A syntax error in a line command causes all command processing to be suspended with an appropriateerror message. Correct or delete the line command in error to resume processing. If scrolling is performedto complete a block command specification or enter a destination, errors in the pending block commandor Move/Copy command must be resolved prior to processing other line commands.If a primary command is in error, all commands before the error are processed. All other processing issuspended and an appropriate error message is displayed. Correct or delete the faulty command toresume processing.Naming ConventionsIn naming objects, you must avoid the use of DB2 reserved words.For sites using DB2 version 8 or later, Long Object Names (LONs) are supported for objects such as tablenames and creator IDs, as described in “Long Object Names (LONs)” on page 8.A Retrieval Definition name consists of the Environment Definition name and the IMS DBD name. Themaximum length for a DBD name is 8 characters. Names of other objects unique to Optim follow DB2conventions. These names, and the maximum length of each, include:Access Definition base name12Column Map base name12Compare Definition base name12Environment Definition name8Group ID8Legacy Table base name18Map ID8Table Map base name12User ID8(Archive) Collection ID8(Archive) Collection Name126IBM InfoSphere Optim for DB2 for z/OS: Common Elements

Delimited IdentifiersA DB2 delimited identifier is a sequence of one or more characters enclosed within quotation marks.Delimited identifiers are required when non standard names are used, such as names with embeddedspaces or periods. DB2 delimited identifiers can be included in the name of any DB2 object.Also, delimited identifiers, with delimiters, can be supplied as the operands of primary commands.However, delimited identifiers are not supported for Access Definition, Table Map, and Column Mapnames.The use of delimited identifiers may require more space than provided on a panel. If so, the entry istruncated and cannot be edited. Use line commands to delete the entry. When line commands are notavailable, the entry area is large enough to support the maximum width so you can edit the entry.To conserve space, the delimiters are not included with the delimited identifier when the name isdisplayed in the heading of a panel. Delimiters are also omitted when delimited names are presented inselection lists.DB2 LIKE SyntaxStandard DB2 naming conventions are supported in Optim, including the ability to use DB2 LIKE syntax.Characters that have special meaning are:% Represents any number of characters.Represents any single character.Use DB2 LIKE syntax for the operand on a primary command to display a matching selection list. Forexample, to obtain a selection list of tables with names that begin with the letters PST, enter:LIST TABLES PST%.%Note that when the '%' character is used in conjunction with the ' ' character, the ' ' is treated as a 'DB2like' character, and not as a literal.File NamesArchive, Compare, and Move use external files to store information necessary for processes and todocument those processes. For these files, you can provide the name explicitly by enclosing it in singlequotes (‘ '), as shown in this example:'SAMPLE.CONTROL.FILE’Alternatively, you can provide a name without quotes so that the default prefix selected on the UserOptions panel is automatically added to the file name. For example, if you provide the file nameSAMPLE.CONTROL.FILEand the current default prefix is FOPDEMO, the resulting file name isFOPDEMO.SAMPLE.CONTROL.FILETo obtain a selection list, specify an asterisk, alone or as the last character in the dataset name. Forexample, to obtain a selection list of names that begin with FOPDEMO.SAMP, specify:'FOPDEMO.SAMP*’Chapter 1. Introduction7

Long Object Names (LONs)DB2 version 8 and higher supports Long Object Names (LONs) for various objects, such as table namesand creator IDs. Optim includes support of up to 128 characters for LON-eligible objects in DB2 Version 8and higher. Shown here are the names of LON-

Nov 02, 2005 · IBM Optim for z/OS manages enterprise data throughout every stage of the information life cycle. Optim enables you to assess, classify, subset, archive, store, and access enterprise application data. . This tool allows you to edit database data, review